Thank You—July 2015

Thank you for food and water
For clothes and shelter
And the many simple pleasures that I enjoy

Thank you for pineapples and chocolate
  You never fail to thrill my palate
You’ve filled my mouth with good
I have good news to give because of you

Thank you for books and for blog
Not like me, but then, still me
I am grateful at the progress I’ve made
Beyond what my words explain

Thank You—March 2015

Thank you for my teachers
Those that stood out
And all the others
I had to learn from every one of them

Mr Maxwell in primary five
One big black Ghanaian
I’d top your class that year two times

Thank for the opportunity to serve
To grow these ones
It had felt like a drain once or twice
I’m sure you can guess why
For the joy I hoped for
The cross was nothing and heavy at the same time
It was the case that you helped me in it

Thank you to my students
I have loved every one of you
Imperfect though I was
I learned as we went along

Thankful that you had something for me
Grateful that I could add to you
I am the better for knowing you

Teachers honour roll:
Mr Maxwell, Mrs Ariba, Mr Eze, Mr Ibironke, Mr Kayode S.G., Engr Eziashi, Dr Anyaeji, Dr Brown …

We appreciate our mothers.

With an introduction by the Dalai Lama…
… the book of James.
— A pocket cannon publication.

Interesting that he says that some key ideas in Buddhism are reflected in the book of James. The fact is, a lot of learning in the ‘established’ faiths and their associated teachings simply reflect natural truths; enough of which truths, perhaps, we can access via commonsense and reflection. However, we sometimes need the obvious to be pointed out to us for it to become obvious. And to be reminded severally for it to remain so.

Don’t mothers do that best?
We appreciate our mothers.

Cheers.

April fool, go to school, tell your teacher…

… thank you!

That’s not the ending we grew up with, but it works for me. Thank you Mr Maxwell, my teacher in primary five. Now, how does that feel? Did other names come to mind. Teacher, mother, sensei, father, oga (boss, master)? It was mothers day yesterday. Thank you mummy and daddy for being my mum and dad.

Also, thank you for reading my writing(s), I hope it has been refreshing and interesting and ‘provoking’ and fun. Heaven, I have quite some way to go. Special appreciation goes to the regular readers. It’s fun to write, and nice to put it out there; It’s more fun to know you read, and exciting that it is ‘liked,’ appreciated, or to think it is a plus.

What a day to put this up. Nice choice.

It is tempting to glance over the acknowledgements page(s) of books and like. What purpose do these pages serve for the reader. I’d just say that some are fun so read, and you might hear some really interesting names as you pronounce them. It’s also a reminder that you’ve been helped and blessed and served by someone at some time or other in your endeavours. Nameless and countless peoples really have done worthwhile work for you: grateful me.

Who sometimes needs to remember that people actually have mattered on the matter. So what? They got paid. Your customers pay you for more than you give them, otherwise, you’d be selling at a loss. Fuzzy logic. We’re human and finite, and we can’t thank and acknowledge everybody. And showing/saying thank you, I luv you, appreciate this that and the other… a million times could get weird ….

What would be on your acknowledgements page now, in the book of your life. We may only remember a few, but thats enough to be grateful for everyone else. Some authors add that, “there are many others who have contributed in various ways to the making of this book ….”

Beyond the fact that people appreciate acknowledgement (even when it’s embarrassing), and that it comes back to bite you, we also need to acknowledge people (even when it’s embarrassing to do so) because it’s simply healthy living—profiting the giver and receiver. The giving/receiving of acknowledgements have got to be sincere to get the health benefits though.

Back to April fools day.

Suddenly a long pause.

It’s Deborah’s birthday.

Acknowledge somebody with a … that results in a happy smile, a belly laugh, or an ‘RFLOL’.